Chapter seven: Making audio journalism visible

Painting sound pictures for listeners is a skill that takes much practice, according to Mark Briggs. Thank god, we have audio journalism to help us with that.

The good thing about audio journalism is that it can be done with a handful of tools — a microphone, recorder and free software. Long gone are the days of silent films. Now, through audio, journalists can capture the true essence of a story.

But what does audio actually bring to the table?

Presence: Now, you can bring your readers to the story, instead of the other way around.

Emotions: Tone, voice, expression and sound can be heard and moreover, felt.

Atmosphere: You can hear the environment and be a part of it.

Audio journalism expert and NPR’s very own Jonathan Kern has some tips for those who want to pursue this medium and how to write for it:

1. Write for the ear:  Write as you speak. Don’t go around using technical words like operose that many have no idea what the heck it means.

2. Use one idea per sentence: When people don’t have a visual aid to go along with a story, they lose a lot of what they hear. So stick to keeping it simple.

3. Repeat complex ideas: If there is something you want to stick to readers, repeat it. If there is something you want to stick to readers, repeat it. If there is something you want to stick to readers, repeat it.

4. Structure your words: Let people feel the tension of the rising action, climax and conclusion!

5. Perform: Keep the listener’s attention and interest any way possible!

Recording audio can be used for many different purposes such as:

So, get out your digital recorder. I f you don’t have one, buy one here and start recording!

Happy reading recording!



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